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Vaulting Security to New Levels

The Controlled Substances Act of 1970


SUMMARY

The Controlled Substances Act (CSA) is a federal drug policy enacted by the 91st United States Congress and signed into a law by President Richard M. Nixon in 1970. This policy regulates controlled substances and the manners in which they are manufactured, imported, possessed, used, housed and distributed. It also lays forth offenses regarding these substances and any prohibited acts. The CSA places the substance into one of five classifications (known as schedules) based upon their medical use, potential for abuse and safety liability.

 

 In order to enforce the CSA, the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) was established in 1973. In its scope the DEA enforces the CSA by ensuring proper registration of any person who handles controlled substances, coordinate government drug control activities, adding/deleting/or changing the schedule of any substance, and many other functions. It is also tasked with coordinating and pursuing drug investigations outside the US.

 

 

SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES

Schedule I – Substances in this schedule have high potential for abuse, have no acceptable medical use in the US, and are not accepted as being safe for medical use. Prescriptions for these drugs are not allowed and have a quota for their production which is regulated by the DEA. Substances in this class include marijuana, heroin, LSD and MDMA. These must be housed in a solid wall vault with limited access.

 

Schedule II – Substances in this schedule acceptable medical use but do have a high abuse potential which can lead to dependence.  Prescriptions made only be given directly by a practitioner and are not refillable. Substances in this class include opium, hydrocodone and morphine. These must be housed in a solid wall vault with limited access.

 

Schedule III – Substances in this schedule has a lesser abuse and liability potential than those in Schedule I or II, has accepted US medical use and has low potential for dependence. Prescriptions cannot be refilled more than six months after the date unless it is renewed by the practitioner. Substances include anabolic steroids, benzphetamine and marinol. These substances must be stored in a wire cage with limited access.

 

Schedule IV – Substances in this schedule have an even lesser liability and abuse potential than those in schedule III and have accepted medical use in the US. Prescriptions may be refilled no more than five times within a six month period. Substances include barbital and chloral hydrate. These substances must be stored in a wire cage with limited access.

 

 

Schedule V – Substances in this schedule have an abuse and liability potential less than those in schedule IV and also have acceptable US medical use. Often, they are available without a prescription except those that are drugs, which must be dispersed by a practitioner. Substances include pyrovalerone and cough suppressants with small amounts of codeine. These substances must be stored in a wire cage with limited access

 

Vault Structures, Inc.  |  3640 Work Drive  |  Fort Myers, FL 33916  |  Telephone: 239-332-3270  |  Toll Free: 800-226-3990  |  Fax: 239-332-5593